Cannabis dating

There are 21 million Google hits for “cannabis and dating,” cannabis-friendly dating services are offered by coaches like Molly Peckler, and if you’re technologically inclined — there’s an app for that. In the age of cell phones, it makes sense that singles would want a streamlined way to find prospective partners with similar interests.

If you’re a cannabis consumer and you’ve ever dated someone who wasn’t, you’re familiar with the occasional frustration of navigating that interaction.

like to smoke weed, says Molly Peckler, CEO of Highly Devoted, a cannabis-friendly coaching and matchmaking firm.

"If you understand why you do it and how it enhances your life, it's easier to communicate that to your partner," she says.

To see whether they live up to the hype, I tried out three cannabis dating apps: High There, 420 Singles, and 420 Friends. There’s a section called “Joints” where you can see and interact with posts from other users, follow trending hashtags, and post your own updates and pictures.Or you could be someone who really loves smoking and will only be with someone else who smokes, too.Figure that out first, then take your potential partner's pulse on their weed use.If you're swiping through your dating apps in hopes of finding a 420-friendly suitor to spark some love today, there are a few things you should consider before you ask them to burn.First things first: Do you even want to get high with them?

Search for cannabis dating:

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Maybe you smoke recreationally before you go out, and like to be high in social scenarios.

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  1. How do you normally feel when going on a first date? I had the butterflies of panic in my stomach, as I usually have when I try something new that’s out of my comfort zone. With speed dating, I expected to have fun and meet some random people.

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