Back dating stock

Take this example, from The Wall Street Journal, which began investigating the practice last fall: "Suppose an executive gets 100,000 options on a day when the stock is at .Exercising them after it has reached would bring a profit of times 100,000, or million.The more costly it is to provide a signal, the more credibility it has.For example, to call a press conference and tell everyone that the firm's...The practice of “backdating” stock option grants has recently captured the attention of regulators, prosecutors, the plaintiffs’ bar, shareholders and the media.The SEC’s Enforcement Division and the offices of the United States Attorney are investigating the option granting practices of dozens of companies and actions taken by their executives.

The date chosen could be one when the company’s stock was at a low, so the options can be in-the-money at the time of granting itself.Law360, New York (June 15, 2006, AM EDT) -- It is virtually impossible to pick up a newspaper these days and not see an article about the ever-growing list of companies being caught up in investigations concerning allegations of backdated stock options.Despite the attention paid to this issue, little has been written explaining why backdating options is problematic and potentially illegal.If the stock increased to a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay /share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for /share, earning

The date chosen could be one when the company’s stock was at a low, so the options can be in-the-money at the time of granting itself.

Law360, New York (June 15, 2006, AM EDT) -- It is virtually impossible to pick up a newspaper these days and not see an article about the ever-growing list of companies being caught up in investigations concerning allegations of backdated stock options.

Despite the attention paid to this issue, little has been written explaining why backdating options is problematic and potentially illegal.

If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).

If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

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The date chosen could be one when the company’s stock was at a low, so the options can be in-the-money at the time of granting itself.Law360, New York (June 15, 2006, AM EDT) -- It is virtually impossible to pick up a newspaper these days and not see an article about the ever-growing list of companies being caught up in investigations concerning allegations of backdated stock options.Despite the attention paid to this issue, little has been written explaining why backdating options is problematic and potentially illegal.If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

/share in profit (

The date chosen could be one when the company’s stock was at a low, so the options can be in-the-money at the time of granting itself.

Law360, New York (June 15, 2006, AM EDT) -- It is virtually impossible to pick up a newspaper these days and not see an article about the ever-growing list of companies being caught up in investigations concerning allegations of backdated stock options.

Despite the attention paid to this issue, little has been written explaining why backdating options is problematic and potentially illegal.

If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).

If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

||

The date chosen could be one when the company’s stock was at a low, so the options can be in-the-money at the time of granting itself.Law360, New York (June 15, 2006, AM EDT) -- It is virtually impossible to pick up a newspaper these days and not see an article about the ever-growing list of companies being caught up in investigations concerning allegations of backdated stock options.Despite the attention paid to this issue, little has been written explaining why backdating options is problematic and potentially illegal.If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

,000 in total).If the stock dropped below /share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

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